Students

I’m delighted to work with undergraduate and postgraduate students. As a University tutor for more than fifteen years, I am familiar with most types of academic writing, including reports, commentaries, essays and dissertations, and I have worked extensively with both native and non-native English speakers.

If we work together, I can help you to produce a clear, correct and consistently presented English-language text. Submitting work written in clear and error-free language allows your examiners to focus on your ideas and arguments, instead of being distracted by presentational issues.

Doing it right: Ethics

If you are a student and would like to work with me on a project that is for University credit, it’s essential that we follow your University’s ethical guidelines with regard to the use of proofreaders. It is your responsibility to locate those guidelines and to share them with me before we begin work. If you are a postgraduate student, I may ask for confirmation that your supervisor is aware you are working with me.

Proofreading for students: What can I help with?

I can correct your spelling, grammar, syntax and formatting to eliminate both errors and inconsistencies.

I can add comments to show where and how your language (but not your argument!) is unclear. I can’t rewrite for you, but I can explain what is wrong so that you can rewrite it yourself.

I can indicate ways to break long paragraphs or shorten long sentences.

I can check that your references are in the required style (e.g. MLA, APA, Chicago) and correct inconsistencies, spelling and formatting errors.

Proofreading for students: What I can’t help with

I can’t offer advice on your structure, argument or content.

I can’t translate, edit or paraphrase your words, in any language.

I can’t advise on the substance of your references and bibliography. This includes cross-checking and checking for completeness.

I can’t create a formatting scheme for you, either in the body of the work or in the references and bibliography.

I can’t follow generic instructions to make work ‘more academic’ or ‘more professional.’